AskDefine | Define hockey

Dictionary Definition

hockey

Noun

1 hockey played on a field; two opposing teams use curved sticks to drive a ball into the opponents' net [syn: field hockey]
2 a game played on an ice rink by two opposing teams of 6 skaters each who try to knock a flat round puck into the opponents' goal with hockey sticks [syn: ice hockey, hockey game]

User Contributed Dictionary

English

Etymology 1

Unknown origin, 16th century, possibly related to hook due to the curvature of the stick.

Pronunciation

  • , /ˈhɒki/, /"hQki/
  • Rhymes with: -ɒki

Noun

  1. Ice hockey, a game on ice in which two teams of six players skate and try to score by shooting a puck into the opposing team's net, using their sticks.
  2. Field hockey, a team sport played on a pitch on solid ground where players have to hit a ball into a net using a hockey stick.
  3. A variation of hockey, such as roller hockey, street hockey, or shinny.
the sport

Etymology 2

Noun

  1. Variation of oche.

References

French

Noun

hockey

Extensive Definition

Hockey is any of a family of sports in which two teams compete by trying to maneuver a ball, or a hard, round disc called a puck, into the opponent's net or goal, using a hockey stick. The dominant version of hockey in a particular region tends to be known simply as hockey, other forms being more fully qualified.

Field hockey

Roller hockey (quad) is the overarching name for a roller sport that has existed since long before inline skates were invented. Roller hockey has been played in sixty countries worldwide and so has many names worldwide. The sport is also known as quad hockey, hóquei em patins, international style ball hockey, rink hockey and hardball hockey. Roller Hockey was a demonstration roller sport at the 1992 Barcelona Summer Olympics.

Unicycle hockey

Unicycle hockey is similar to roller or inline hockey, however, each player must be mounted on their unicycle (with both feet on the pedals) to play at the ball. The ball is similar weight and bounce to a "dead" tennis ball and sticks are as in roller hockey. The game is "non-contact". Each team consists of five players (one is usually a goalkeeper, but with no special rights or obligations), and substitution is allowed at any point in the game. Any player who allows his stick to impede an opposing player commits a foul, regardless of intent. Players must also keep one hand on the end of the stick at all times and never allow the head of the stick to be lifted above waist height.

Other forms of hockey

Other games derived from hockey or its predecessors include the following:
  • Ball hockey is played in a gym using sticks and a ball, often a tennis ball with the fuzz removed.
  • Air hockey is played indoors with a puck on an air-cushion table.
  • Bandy is played with a ball on a football-sized ice arena, typically outdoors. It is in some ways field hockey played on ice, but bandy has in fact more in common with association football (soccer).
  • Beach hockey was a professional league that played for three seasons at Huntington Beach, California. The game was played on inline skates at a rink. The league was canceled after ESPN stopped funding them due to low ratings.
  • Broomball is played on an ice hockey rink, but with a ball instead of a puck and a "broom" (actually a stick with a small plastic implement on the end) in place of the ice hockey stick. Instead of using skates, special shoes are used that have very soft rubbery soles to maximize grip while running around.
  • Bubble hockey is played in a plastic sealed table with the 'players' being moved by the use of pushing and turning rods.
  • Floorball, is a form of hockey played in a gymnasium or in sport halls. A whiffle ball is used instead of a plastic ball, and the sticks are made from composite materials. The sticks are only one meter long, allowing better stickhandling, and making the game a whole lot safer. It is very popular in Europe, and is widely recognized as the world's fastest growing sport.
  • Foot hockey is played using a bald tennis ball or rolled up pair of socks and using only the feet. It is popular at elementary schools in the winter.
  • Gym hockey is a form of ice hockey played in a gymnasium. It uses sticks with foam ends and a foam ball or a plastic puck.
  • Hurling and Camogie are Irish games bearing some resemblance to - and notable differences from - hockey.
  • Indoor field hockey is an indoor variation of field hockey.
  • Mini hockey (Popularly known as "Mini-Sticks") is a form of hockey which is played in basements of houses. Players get down on their knees, using a miniature plastic stick, usually about 15 inches (38 cm) long and a small blue ball or a soft, fabric covered mini puck. They shoot into miniature goals as well. This is popular throughout North America, though it has not yet made the jump to Europe. In England this refers to a seven-a-side version of Field Hockey, played on an area equivalent to half a normal pitch for younger players, see Minkey (Mini Hockey)
  • PowerHockey is a form of hockey for persons requiring the use of an electric (power) wheelchair in daily life. PowerHockey is a competitive sports opportunity for the physically disabled.
  • Ringette is an ice hockey variant that was designed for female players; it uses a straight stick and a rubber ring in place of a puck. Note: Ringette distances itself from hockey as it has its own set of rules and is closely related to a mix of lacrosse and basketball.
  • Rinkball is a Scandinavian team sport, played in an ice hockey rink with a ball.
  • Rossall Hockey is a variation played at Rossall School on the sea shore in the winter months. Its rules are a mix of field hockey, Rugby and the Eton Wall Game.
  • Shinny is an informal version of ice hockey.
  • Shinty is a Scottish Highlands game
  • Skater hockey is a variant of inline hockey, played with a ball.
  • Sledge hockey is a form of ice hockey played by the disabled. The players sit on sleds, and push themselves up and down the ice with picks on the butt end of their shortened hockey sticks. The game is played with many of the same rules as regular ice hockey.
  • Spongee is a cross between ice hockey and broomball and is most popular in Manitoba, Canada. A stick and puck are used as in hockey (the puck is a softer version called a "sponge puck"), and the same soft-soled shoes used in broomball are worn. The rules are basically the same as ice hockey, but one variation has an extra player on the ice called a "rover".
  • Table hockey is played indoors with a table-top game.
  • Underwater hockey is played on the bottom of a swimming pool.
  • Nok hockey A table-top version of hockey played with no defense and a small block in front of the goal.

References

External links

Field hockey

hockey in Afrikaans: Hokkie
hockey in Asturian: Ḥoquei
hockey in Min Nan: Kau-kiû
hockey in Belarusian (Tarashkevitsa): Хакей
hockey in Bosnian: Hokej
hockey in Catalan: Hoquei
hockey in Chuvash: Хоккей
hockey in Czech: Hokej
hockey in German: Hockey
hockey in Modern Greek (1453-): Χόκεϊ
hockey in Spanish: Hockey
hockey in Esperanto: Hokeo
hockey in Basque: Hockey
hockey in French: Hockey
hockey in Korean: 하키
hockey in Hindi: हॉकी
hockey in Indonesian: Hoki
hockey in Italian: Hockey
hockey in Haitian: Oki
hockey in Malayalam: ഹോക്കി
hockey in Japanese: ホッケー
hockey in Norwegian: Hockey
hockey in Polish: Hokej
hockey in Portuguese: Hóquei
hockey in Kölsch: Hockey
hockey in Russian: Хоккей
hockey in Sanskrit: यष्टिकन्दुक
hockey in Simple English: Hockey
hockey in Slovak: Hokej
hockey in Slovenian: Hokej (razločitev)
hockey in Swedish: Hockey
hockey in Tamil: வளைதடிப் பந்தாட்டம்
hockey in Thai: ฮอกกี้
hockey in Ukrainian: Хокей
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